The “I Love My Instant Pot Cooking for One” Recipe Book

      

          No matter if I’m eating by myself or cooking for friends and family, I want to enjoy a good meal. And when time is short or I don’t want to fuss, The “I Love My Instant Pot Cooking for One” Recipe Book authorized by Instant Pot is a great book to turn to. Written by Lisa Childs, author of the blog TriedTestedandTrue.com, there are 175 recipes and lots of great color photos. Childs, who has been developing recipes for Instant Pot since 2016, provides accurate details so that even if you’re not familiar with using an Instant Pot, she makes how to do so easily understandable.

         Childs’ Instant Pot recipes, designed for one person, are perfect when cooking just for yourself but can easily be shared by two with the addition of a side dish—say corn on the cob or freshly sliced tomatoes.

The following recipes are from The “I Love My Instant Pot Cooking for One.”

Easy Teriyaki Chicken Thighs and Rice

Tender chicken thighs and white rice cook together in the Instant Pot® with premade teriyaki sauce for the simplest, easiest one-pot meal. With only a few ingredients, anyone can make a delicious and quick meal at home.

• Hands-On Time: 5 minutes

• Cook Time: 20 minutes

Serves 1

  • 2 (8-ounce) boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • 1⁄2 cup teriyaki sauce
  • 1⁄2 cup uncooked long-grain white rice
  • 1⁄2 cup water
  • 1⁄2 tablespoon sesame seeds
  • 1⁄2 tablespoon chopped green onion

To the Instant Pot®, add chicken and pour teriyaki sauce over the top. Place the trivet on top of chicken.

In a 6″ cake pan, combine rice and water. Place uncovered pan on trivet.

Close the lid; turn the knob to Sealing.

Press Manual or Pressure Cook button and adjust time to 10 minutes.

When the timer beeps, allow 5 minutes to naturally release the pressure, then remove the lid. Press Sauté button and adjust to High.

Carefully remove pan from the Instant Pot® and fluff rice with a fork. Place chicken (leave teriyaki sauce in Instant Pot) on top of rice and set aside. Cover to keep warm.

Cook down remaining teriyaki sauce about 5 minutes until reduced and thickened. Pour over chicken and rice, then top with sesame seeds and green onion. Serve.

Per serving

CALORIES: 704; FAT: 12g; PROTEIN: 43g; SODIUM: 5,605mg; | FIBER: 2g; CARBOHYDRATES: 98g; SUGAR: 21g

Bruschetta Chicken

Hands-On Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Serves 1

Chicken

  • 1 cup water
  • 1 (8-ounce) boneless, skinless chicken breast
  • 1⁄8 teaspoon salt
  • 1⁄8 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1⁄4 teaspoon Italian seasoning
  • 2 (1-ounce) slices fresh mozzarella cheese

Bruschetta

  • 1⁄3 cup diced tomatoes
  • 1⁄2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1⁄4 teaspoon balsamic glaze
  • 1⁄4 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh basil
  • 1⁄16 teaspoon crushed
  • Red pepper flakes
  • 1⁄16 teaspoon ground
  • Black pepper
  • 1⁄16 teaspoon salt

Pour water into Instant Pot® and add the trivet.

Place chicken on the trivet, then season with salt, black pepper, and Italian seasoning.

Close the lid; turn the knob to Sealing.

Press Manual or Pressure Cook button and adjust time to 15 minutes.

While the chicken is cooking, prepare Bruschetta. In a small bowl, mix together all Bruschetta ingredients. Let chill in refrigerator until ready to serve.

When the timer beeps, allow 5 minutes to naturally release the pressure, then remove the lid. Place mozzarella slices on top of chicken and replace the lid. Let sit 5 minutes with lid on to allow the cheese to melt slightly.

Remove to a serving plate and top with Bruschetta. Serve immediately.

 Per Serving

CALORIES: 472; FAT: 22g; PROTEIN: 60g; SODIUM: 1,020mg; FIBER: 1g; CARBOHYDRATES: 8g; SUGAR: 4g

Kirk Herbstreit: Out of the Pocket

      

Eight schools in just as many years, parents divorcing, new step-parents, more divorces, more new homes, overwhelming shyness, red-faced when emotional and almost always feeling out of place. It doesn’t sound like the prerequisites for Kirk Herbstreit’s stellar career as a sportscaster and star of College GameDay.

       But Herbstreit always had football and no matter what school he landed in, he made the team, and he was a star. It might not have been enough—not with a stepmother who didn’t mind entertaining male guests in front of her stepson when his father was out of town, a barely tolerable stepfather, and constantly saying goodbye to friends, attempting to make new ones, and trying to hide out in the back row of the classroom in his newest school. But what else could a kid like Herbstreit learn to do but stuff his feelings deep inside and throw the ball. It worked.

       For a while.

Herbstreit was playing for Ohio State University just as his father had. But things weren’t going well. He didn’t quite fit in with the program. Suddenly he wasn’t a star. He was barely on the team.

Dallas, TX – October 6, 2018 – Fair Park: Desmond Howard, Rece Davis, Toby Keith, Lee Corso and Kirk Herbstreit on the set of College GameDay Built by the Home Depot (Photo by Scott Clarke / ESPN Images)

       In other words, it wasn’t working.

       “I’ve always been the guy who tried to say the right thing, to tell people what I thought they wanted to her,” says Herbstreit in his new autobiography, Out of the Pocket: Football, Fatherhood, and College GameDay Saturdays written with longtime ESPN reporter Gene Wojciechowski. “I’m a shy guy, the one who holds things in—it’s my way. I’m an introvert by nature.”  

Tallahassee, FL – November 2, 2013 – Doak Campbell Stadium: Lee Corso and Kirk Herbstreit on the set of College GameDay Built by the Home Depot (Photo by Phil Ellsworth / ESPN Images)

       On the phone Herbstreit seems like the kind of guy you could talk to for hours. He’s friendly, he’s chatty, he listens, he doesn’t need to dominate the conversation, he’s open about his feelings, and he cries at sentimental movies.

       So what happened to the stuffing feelings thing?

“I’ve come a long way from what I was,” says Herbstreit. “I just evolved.”

But it was more than that. He took a huge step. It seems there’s was this funky looking OSU team doctor.

“He had this look to him,” Herbstreit recalls about the team’s therapist. It’s not an unusual comment about psychiatrists.

“It was 1990, forget 2021,” says Herbstreit about deciding to talk to a mental health professional.  “I remember going into his office looking over both my shoulders, like Matt Damon in Good Will Hunting. I was very standoffish, giving the answers he might want to hear. I was just giving him canned answers, then he started talking to me about my background, saying tell me about your mom, your dad, and I suddenly started talking about what I’d been through. He was the first person I really talked to about all this. He became my confident, my guy. I was skipping when I went into his office. When the season ended, I went up to get three different awards, the last time I went up was to get the most valuable player, I just got it out, I said there’s this guy, it was such a credibly positive experience. It was a game changer.”

Herbstreit was the youngest of three siblings, John and Teri, who after their parents’ divorce lived with their mother, a struggling car sales person. When she didn’t sell a car, they didn’t eat. They often scrounged for food. Their father? Missing in action. But to give him his due, he may have taken one too many hard blows to the head while playing football for Ohio State. It changed him, Herbstreit’s mother claimed. Whatever the cause, his father was remote and withdrew from his kids’ life for long periods after the divorce. He married a woman who kicked John out of the house. Teri took over a big part of parenting her younger brother, giving up a big chunk of what should have been her fun years.

Pasadena, CA – January 1, 2020 – Rose Bowl: Kirk Herbstreit and Chris Fowler in the broadcast booth during the 2020 Rose Bowl presented by Northwestern Mutual (Photo by Joe Faraoni / ESPN Images)

But Herbstreit revered his father, no matter what. When the family still lived together, he would go down to the basement and lovingly unpack his father’s football momentous from his days as a player and then coach at OSU. And there was his dad’s Captain’s Mug—the ultimate trophy.

And in Herbstreit’s last year at Ohio, he would get his own OSU Captain’s Mug.

How often does that happen?

“In 130 years in football it’s happened three times,” says Herbstreit, who after a pause adds, “some kids go through divorce angry, I never had that, I just wanted my dad. He was my hero—he was Zeus, he was Superman, when I finally got voted captain, the first person I wanted to call was my dad.”

But his father had a hard time listening. It taught Herbstreit, the father of four sons, how important it was to listen to his kids.

After his senior year, Herbstreit was offered a totally awesome job as a medical supply sales rep—six figures, a company car, and 401k plan. But he wanted to be a sports talk show host and he also had an offer doing just that. It paid $12,000 with no benefits. Seems like an easy decision. It was. Herbstreit took the radio sports job with WBNS 1460. He worked his way up.

And then he got the call. A try out for College Game Day. He was a disaster—he was visibly sweating, and his face was bright red. Afterwards the only thing Herbstreit could remember was that he jabbered away but not what he said. Oh and he did remember Lee Corso kindly telling him over and over again to relax. It was bust he thought, knowing he was up against the much better known Mike Adamle who was considered a shoo-in for the job.

But we know how it turned out. Herbstreit has been on College GameDay for more than 30 years.

As long as we’re talking football, does Herbstreit have any comments on Justin Fields, the new Chicago Bears quarterback?

“Congratulations, congratulations, you’ve got a great player, who has a chip on his shoulder and is competitive, the players will love their teammate,” says Herbstreit in what is music to a Bears fan’s ears.

Pullman: The Man, the Company, the Historic Park by Kenneth Schoon

               Kenneth Schoon, professor emeritus at Indiana University Northwest, has immersed himself in the history of the Greater Chicago/Northwest Indiana area for decades, writing books starting from the area’s earliest beginnings such as “Calumet Beginnings: Ancient Shorelines and Settlements at the South End of Lake Michigan” and “Swedish Settlements on the South Shore of Lake Michigan.”

               In his latest book, “Pullman: The Man, the Company, the Historical Park” (History Press 2021; $21.99), he showcases what once was among  the ultimate company town and is now a Chicago neighborhood. George Pullman, whose last name became synonymous with plush railroad sleeper cars, believed that happy workers were productive workers and so developed his town along the western shore of Lake Calumet in the late 1800s.

               I thought I knew company towns having grown up in East Chicago, Indiana my friends whose parents worked at Inland Steel lived in Sunnyside in Indiana  Harbor. On the East Chicago side there was Marktown built in 1917 by Clayton Mark, for those employed at the company he owned, Mark Manufacturing.

               But they’re different Schoon tells me. Both Marktown and Sunnyside were residential neighborhoods. But Pullman was an actual town with its own schools, library, churches, Masonic Hall, businesses, and even a band. Garbage and maintenance was paid for by the company.

In 2015, then President Barack Obama proclaimed Chicago’s Pullman District as a National Monument, encompassing many of its surviving buildings such as the former Pullman Palace Car Works, the Greenstone Church, formerly the Greenstone United Methodist Church, the A. Philip Randolph Pullman Porter Museum, workers’ homes, the Pullman Administration Clock Tower Building, Arcade Park, and the Florence Hotel, named after Pullman’s oldest daughter.

               Though I vaguely knew about the town of Pullman, it had never been on my radar as a place to visit even though it was less than eleven miles from where I lived.

               “The same with me,” says Schoon who remembered going to the Florence Hotel, one of the fanciest structures in town, to eat when young never to return until hired by the Historic Pullman Foundation to write about the history of the town for their brochure.

               Today we talk about experiences, but that’s what Pullman was all about back then. His sleeper cars were luxurious, but the brand also meant great service. After the Civil War, he hired recently emancipated African American men, to work as porters becoming the largest employer of Blacks in the U.S. Their jobs were to attend to passengers needs by serving food and drink, shining shoes, tidying up the train, making sure the temperature was just right and that lighting fixtures worked.  Black women were hired as maids to take care of women guests on the most expensive cars—babysitting children, helping with their baths, giving manicures, and fixing their hair.

               Pullman was no dinky little town. The Arcade Theatre could accommodate 1000 people and Schoon says it was, for a time, the finest theater west of the Hudson River.

               With the advent of automobiles and highways, the need for sleeper cars lessened. But luckily many of Pullman’s historic buildings remain including the Florence Hotel which is currently closed for renovations but expected to open within a few years.

               “The old stable is now a store,” says Schoon. “The old fire station is still there and of the 600 residential buildings all but three are still standing.”

               In an interesting tidbit, Schoon notes that Pullman was originally dry because George Pullman was a Prohibitionist. Luckily for those who  wanted to imbibe, Kensington, the town next door had 23 taverns at the time.

               Kenneth Schoon will be signing copies of his book during the Labor Day Weekend at the Grand Opening of Pullman National Monument Visitor Center and Pullman State Historic Site Factory. For more information about times and other events, visit www.pullmanil.org

%d bloggers like this: